A few weeks ago, I wrote about the tech rut and pump limbo in which I seem to have found myself. Since then a couple of things have happened to start to move me from a sense of complete and utter inertia about the state of play in diabetes technology in Australia right now.

Firstly, I actually made steps to start Looping. I’ve had all I need sitting here ready to go, but it was only last weekend that I actually started working through the steps to get things going. More on this in coming weeks if I can get it all sorted out and actually understand what the fuck I’m doing.

And the second thing was when Aaron from Medical Specialties Australasia reached out to me with the exciting news that the Cellnovo pump system is coming to Australia. Very, very soon. We arranged to meet at a café so we could chat and he could show me the pump. (For the record, MSA was the Australian distributor of the Deltec Cozmo pump many moons ago.)

According to Aaron, the pump has TGA approval and is listed on schedule 5 of the prosthesis list, meaning those with private health insurance should be covered. Consumables are in the process of being listed on the NDSS and costs will be comparable to currently listed insulin pump consumables.

The Cellnovo ‘kit’ includes two pumps and a nifty looking touchscreen handset which drives the pump and doubles as a glucose meter. The pump is small and is stuck directly to the skin via a Velcro patch. (It’s not a patch pump as there is a small tube that runs from the cannula to the cartridge.)

The cartridge holds a max of 150 units of insulin, so this is not the pump for people who are on really large doses. But, if you’re like me, it’s way, way more than enough for the three days the cartridge lasts.

The ‘consumables’ combine the ‘cap’ for for the pump as well as the cannula/infusion set and cartridge.

Other features that may be of interest: it’s waterproof. It has a built in activity tracker, which for those who are interested in doing activity (i.e. not me), then this may be a super useful little tool; it’s rechargeable, so no need to carry around a spare battery. (You swap over the pumps every three days, charging one while wearing the other.)

I’ve not used the pump, so I can’t really talk about what it feels like or how easy the handset is to use, but I did play with it a bit the other day and it appeared super easy.

I can talk about the fact that there is about to be another pump on the Australian market, and considering the sad state of affairs at present, I see this as a really positive move. I have always been an advocate for choice. People with diabetes should be offered a smorgasbord of diabetes management options and then be able to customise the devices, drugs and plan that works best for us at that moment. It’s not a static arrangement (because, diabetes isn’t a static health condition) and we should be able to change as we need.

With the current situation, we don’t have a smorgasbord. Instead, we have a very limited set menu that seems to be getting smaller and smaller, and while that may be great for the big players in the market, it is crappy for people with diabetes.

Cellnovo introduces another option that may just be the right choice for some people, and that’s terrific.

WANT MORE?

For more information about Cellnovo click here.

In Australia, the Cellnovo pump is being distributed by Medical Specialties Australia. For details, click here.

 

DISCLOSURES

None! Although Aaron did buy me a coffee …  And when there are pumps available in Australia, I may do a trial. As always, I’m writing in my own thoughts in my own (probably swear-y) words.